Astronomie Populaire, Volume 2 PDF

Copernican Revolution of the 1500s, they still believed in a astronomie Populaire, Volume 2 PDF model with the Earth at the center of the Universe. The engraving depicts a man, clothed in a long robe and carrying a staff, who is at the edge of the Earth, where it meets the sky.


This book was originally published prior to 1923, and represents a reproduction of an important historical work, maintaining the same format as the original work. While some publishers have opted to apply OCR (optical character recognition) technology to the process, we believe this leads to sub-optimal results (frequent typographical errors, strange characters and confusing formatting) and does not adequately preserve the historical character of the original artifact. We believe this work is culturally important in its original archival form. While we strive to adequately clean and digitally enhance the original work, there are occasionally instances where imperfections such as blurred or missing pages, poor pictures or errant marks may have been introduced due to either the quality of the original work or the scanning process itself. Despite these occasional imperfections, we have brought it back into print as part of our ongoing global book preservation commitment, providing customers with access to the best possible historical reprints. We appreciate your understanding of these occasional imperfections, and sincerely hope you enjoy seeing the book in a format as close as possible to that intended by the original publisher.

He kneels down and passes his head, shoulders, and right arm through the star-studded sky, discovering a marvellous realm of circling clouds, fires and suns beyond the heavens. In 1957, astronomer Ernst Zinner claimed that the image dated to the German Renaissance, but he was unable to find any version published earlier than 1906. Flammarion had been apprenticed at the age of twelve to an engraver in Paris and it is believed that many of the illustrations for his books were engraved from his own drawings, probably under his supervision. Therefore, it is plausible that Flammarion himself created the image, though the evidence for this remains inconclusive.

Like most other illustrations in Flammarion’s books, the engraving carries no attribution. The idea of the contact of a solid sky with the earth is one that repeatedly appears in Flammarion’s earlier works. Christian saint, Macarius the Roman, which he dates to the 6th century. Macarius, the monks do not in fact find the place where earth and sky touch.

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